Decrypting Diabetes [Part I]

What is diabetes?

High blood sugar. We test for it by monitoring blood sugar after a fasting period. If your blood sugar is over a certain amount, we call you diabetic.

Symptoms:

  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Blurred vision
  • Slow-healing sores
  • Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections

Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, though it often appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it’s more common in people older than 40. 

But let’s think about this for a second with our other theories in mind. We’ve shown how your brain perceives time, and proven personal relativity. So we know that diabetes is a negative thing, and it’s closely correlated to high blood pressure and heart disease. So people with diabetes have more brain entropy and experience time more slowly, and age faster. But everyone generally eats about the same. If we’re talking meal times. The diabetic mind, seems to store blood sugar. Almost being designed for closer to a fasting environment.

How does blood sugar look over time?

blood-sugar-level-chart

Why would the body release sugars more slowly in people who experience time so slowly? It seems to be counter intuitive.

It’s the same reason that you say old people’s metabolisms slow down. When your body is under stress, time is dilating, and your hunger may be uncontrollable. Think about it, if every hour is an eternity, it’s really not that crazy to be eating that often. The truth is not that drastic, but that’s the idea.

Here’s what it is: blood sugar is external stress. We know that those individuals that age faster heal slower. And those that sunburn faster, recover slower. So naturally, if blood sugar is a stress, the further you are from your ground state, the longer it takes for your body to recover or, in this case, process it.

Why are diabetics so hungry and thirsty, and pee so often? 

That’s simple. They perceive time differently. Their time is shortened because of the stress on their bodies and their brains. Just imagine twice the amount of time passing in between meals for you. That’s what it feels like for them.

Can you explain why diabetics would lose weight? 

Yes. Here’s how that works: the diabetic continues their eating habits even though their perception of time has changed. Essentially, he or she could be experiencing three days of personal time in a single day, depending on their level of entropy. So if this is true, it all makes sense. The weight loss is explainable.

Why do old people develop it so often? 

The entropy of their brains is higher. They are furthest from their ground state. This is why they recover slower, and why they lose their vision.

Is it not just a disease for fat people? 

No. It’s way more complicated than that. Plenty of skinny people have it, and plenty of overweight and obese people don’t. I wish it was that simple. It’s just not.

So is it reversible? I think so. I need to dig in to case studies. I know that you can change your perception of time. I guess it depends on how open minded you are. We know the ground state is attainable. The question is ‘what are you willing to do to get there?’

Sources

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-answers/dawn-effect/faq-20057937
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/
  3. http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html
  4. http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths
  5. http://www.diabetes.org/assets/pdfs/basics/cdc-statistics-report-2017.pdf
  6. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20371444

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