When Fair Markets Aren’t Fair

According to Wikipedia:

Fair market value (FMV) is an estimate of the market value of a property, based on what a knowledgeable, willing, and unpressured buyer would probably pay to a knowledgeable, willing, and unpressured seller in the market. An estimate of fair market value may be founded either on precedent or extrapolation. Fair market value differs from the intrinsic value that an individual may place on the same asset based on their own preferences and circumstances.

So in Lamar County, we have some land that the School Board owns. The improvers of land there pay annual leases, adjusted annually, and in the event of sale. The owners of the leasehold interest pay 5%-7% of the fair market land value annually, to the school board. 

How do they establish fair market value? They look at appraisals. But the appraisers have a State mandate to use fee simple comps to appraise the 16th Section property. So essentially, if this property didn’t have this additional expense, it would be worth X. And that’s it. X is the value that they are using. 

If I have a rental home that I’m selling for $150K, and there’s an identical one down the road selling for $150k, but has an additional $50k in annual expenses, which one would you buy? It’s a no brainer. 

In Lamar County, there are 16th Section lease holders who are “tossing back the keys” to their properties. The skyrocket of 16th Section fees just made it completely ridiculous to stay in business there. Now you can pick up these properties for the cost of the annual lease. To me, that is called free. In a fair market, when something is free, it effects the cost of similar goods or services in the area. But in Lamar County, we’re using appraisals on fee simple land, when there is similar 16th Section land right across the road for free. 

How do we fix it? Redefine fair market. Or really, just use the actual definition

  • The appraised properties need to have the same conditions as the subject property, or at least be adjusted to those conditions. 
  • If something is given back in that market, it needs to effect that market. If I pick up a piece of property for free, appraisers should be able to use that as a comp. 

 It’s how fair markets work. This isn’t one of those. 

Entropy and the Brain

So here’s an article about the entropy in the brain and how it increases with age. This fits my model of aging, “brainbeats”, and personal time perception. There are mixed studies on whether more or less entropy in the brain is better. But we already know the answer to that.

  • Less entropy the better.
  • Caffeine creates brain entropy. And so do a bunch of other things
  • Stress is entropy.
  • Entropy alters personal relativity. May want to check out this article on that. 

Entropy always increases in a closed system, but we are not closed systems. It’s the second law of thermodynamics.

So, let’s assume the brain is a cylinder filled with gas. It should adhere to the following equation: PV=nRT, where P is pressure, V is volume, and T is temperature. n and R are constants the won’t apply since this calculation is more a correlation. We haven’t figured out those constants for the brain yet. 

As the temperature rises, the entropy rises. And either pressure or volume rises. So, in the closed system of your body, entropy always increases. But, if we allow your brain to expand, we can decrease the pressure and temperature.

So our brains shrink over time. And if they shrink, the pressure of our ideal gas, and temperature will rise accordingly. Entropy rises. But we know that all of this is just further from our ground state, where we sleep, recover, and learn best. Our perceptions of time will shorten, and hasten our aging process.

What is associated with elevated brain pressure?

One of the most damaging aspects of brain trauma and other conditions, directly correlated with poor outcome, is an elevated intracranial pressure. ICP is very likely to cause severe harm if it rises too high. Very high intracranial pressures are usually fatal if prolonged, but children can tolerate higher pressures for longer periods. An increase in pressure, most commonly due to head injury leading to intracranial hematoma or cerebral edema, can crush brain tissue, shift brain structures, contribute to hydrocephalus, cause brain herniation, and restrict blood supply to the brain. It is a cause of reflex bradycardia. [Source]

Can our brains grow? Yes. That should not surprise you. As the volume increases, brain pressure in the model would go down. But later in life, they start shrinking, and so do we. They grow until you start trying to lose weight. They go until you start aging. They grow until you throw in the towel. Here’s a chart of brain weight over time. See for yourself. The decrease in brain weight corresponds with aging.

Brain_weight_age (1)

What, if anything are the takeaways here? The brain follows the second law of thermodynamics. Entropy causes aging. I’m adding this to my brain model. What’s next? Apply this model to the Bends and altitude sickness. 

Sources

  1. https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/dev.html
  2. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-21008-6
  3. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep02853
  4. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newscientist.com/article/mg21128311-800-a-brief-history-of-the-brain/amp/
  5. http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/03/study-4-factors-that-may-shrink-your-brain/

Huntington’s is not genetic

Even doctors admit that it’s hard to distinguish between Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s. Here’s an article saying that treatment for one of these diseases may work for the other two. 

Some researchers and physicians consider the differentiation between cortical and sub-cortical dementia important for patient diagnosis, but others remain skeptical that a significant difference exists. The major criticism of the studies that show variation between cortical and sub-cortical dementias is that there is pathological overlap between the sample groups that are used to model the two categories. These studies often assume that Alzheimer’s patients mostly have cortical dementia and HD or Parkinson’s patients preferentially exhibit subcortical dementia. Necropsies have shown, however, that the brains of both Alzheimer’s and HD patients exhibit a certain degree of both categories of dementia.

If in fact both cortical and subcortical dementia occur in Alzheimer’s, HD, and Parkinson’s patients, then these studies may be problematic. As a result, physicians are still trying to learn more about the differences between the pathologies of the diseases in hopes of finding a more reliable way of differentiating dementias. The ability to differentiate dementias may lead researchers and physicians to better diagnose and treat neurodegenerative diseases. [Source]

We’re going to go through the symptoms, but if you’ve been reading, you know how this goes.

So first, here are the symptoms:

Cognitive: amnesia, delusion, lack of concentration, memory loss, mental confusion, slowness in activity, or difficulty thinking and understanding

Muscular: abnormality walking, increased muscle activity, involuntary movements, problems with coordination, loss of muscle, or muscle spasms

Behavioral: compulsive behavior, fidgeting, irritability, or lack of restraint

Psychological: delirium, depression, hallucination, or paranoia

Mood: anxiety, apathy, or mood swings

Also common: tremor, weight loss, or impaired voice

Those look familiar. Are there any symptoms that aren’t covered between Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia? 

“For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed.” Wait…what? I thought the symptoms were the only things separating this from the other diseases?

And is it really genetic? It’s complicated, but the consensus is yes. Even though 10% of cases are “due to a new mutation.” But what about that field of epigenetics that basically says that your genes can change over time? Here’s the unabridged version.

HD is typically inherited from a person’s parents, although up to 10% of cases are due to a new mutation. The disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in either of an individual’s two copies of a gene called Huntingtin. This means a child of an affected person typically has a 50% chance of inheriting the disease. The Huntingtin gene provides the genetic information for a protein that is also called “huntingtin”. Expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats in the gene coding for the Huntingtin protein results in an abnormal protein, which gradually damages cells in the brain, through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Diagnosis is by genetic testing, which can be carried out at any time, regardless of whether or not symptoms are present. This fact raises several ethical debates: the age at which an individual is considered mature enough to choose testing; whether parents have the right to have their children tested; and managing confidentiality and disclosure of test results.

This segment is made up of a series of three DNA building blocks (cytosine, adenine, and guanine) that appear multiple times in a row. Normally, the CAG segment is repeated 10 to 35 times within the gene. In people with Huntington disease, the CAG segment is repeated 36 to more than 120 times. People with 36 to 39 CAG repeats may or may not develop the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease, while people with 40 or more repeats almost always develop the disorder.

So if you have 27-39 repeats of this code you may or may not get the disease. But if you have 40 or more repeats, you almost always get the disorder. Wait…almost always? So you’re saying even the hard science isn’t foolproof.

The number of CAG repeats in an HD gene can be unstable when the gene is passed on to the next generation. That means the number of CAG repeats can increase or decrease when the gene is passed from parent to child. Wait, it varies from generation to generation? In the sole aspect that we’re using to call it genetic?

Older fathers are more likely to pass along the extended copy of this gene. We’ve talked about aging parents several times before. We know that the age of mothers closely correlates to Down Syndrome, while the age of fathers closely correlates to Dwarfism.

I have a question for you. How often do we test people with dementia for this CAG repeat? I’m guessing there is not much reason to test for Huntington’s when there is no family history. 

So in summary, here’s why I don’t think Huntington’s disease is genetic:

  • 10% of cases are “random” mutations
  • Even the hard science is not absolute
  • It gets more probable with aging dad’s
  • Epigenetics. Our genes change over time.

So if it is not genetic, then it is practically indistinguishable from Alzheimers and Parkinson’s.

Did science get it wrong? Maybe so. I think that a bunch of guys spent their lives studying batches of symptoms, it was the least we could do to name these batches of symptoms after them. All the other fields of science do it. Here’s the problem, the more classifications did not lead to more knowledge in this case. Because the symptoms are indistinguishable.

Sources:

  1. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6677/huntington-disease
  2. https://en.hdbuzz.net/027
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3140172/
  4. https://www.alz.org/dementia/huntingtons-disease-symptoms.asp
  5. http://hdsa.org/what-is-hd/
  6. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/huntingtons-disease/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20356122

Explaining Superhuman Strength

We’ve all heard the story of the pregnant woman lifting a car off someone. There are so many examples. Maybe you’ve even experienced one of these events. Here’s how it happens.

We’ve already proven over and over again how we control our own aging and our own perception of time. Stress makes our brain work harder, and makes us age faster. But when you break it down to individual moments, it get’s really interesting. The fight or flight instinct, when many people say that “time stands still.” It’s because it basically does. Their brains are so active, that time slows almost to a stop. They are the furthest things from relaxed.

Bear with me. 

  • Force=mass x acceleration
  • Acceleration= change in velocity/ change in time

Everything is the same as it would be in the gym, but because of the change in brain activity, the change in time shortens. So if you let the change in time approach zero, you can see that there is basically infinite potential for force. So this calculation makes it possible for you to do superhuman things when you’re under large amounts of stress.

Sources:

  1. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/extreme-fear/201011/yes-you-really-can-lift-car-trapped-child
  2. https://abcnews.go.com/US/superhero-woman-lifts-car-off-dad/story?id=16907591

 

 

 

High blood pressure starts in the brain

We’ve proven how the brain perceives time, and your blood pressure is a sign of this perception. How? The second derivative of time is a variable in pressure. And this pressure is in the closed system of your body.

Here’s some more detail for those who want it, from a physics nerd. Pressure equals force/area. Force equals mass times acceleration. Acceleration is the change in velocity over time. Time here is relative to the subject. Relative to their brain activity. 

We control our own time. Our time is represented in our blood pressure. So current blood pressure essentially equals current time perception. Thus, it would make sense that people with a history of high blood pressure would die the soonest. They are aging the fastest. Well, in theory. One blood pressure reading is really just the instantaneous time perception.

Have I done an adequate job getting to this point? Probably not. We experience time differently. We age differently. These things are related. Athletes age slowest, and use their brains the best. The more stress we have in our lives, the more we age, the faster our time accelerates, and the higher our blood pressure, and the worse athletes we become.

So next time you go to the doctor, and read 140/80, they may be right that you’re going to die early, but they have no idea why. How can the medications they give you solve your problem if they don’t understand the organ that’s effected first?

Sources:

  1. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/12/17/real-cause-heart-attacks.aspx
  2. https://www.medicinenet.com/high_blood_pressure_hypertension/article.htm#what_is_high_blood_pressure_what_is_normal_blood_pressure
  3. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/GettheFactsAboutHighBloodPressure/The-Facts-About-High-Blood-Pressure_UCM_002050_Article.jsp#.WyhfqUgvzrc
  4. https://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure-hypertension/blood-pressure-reading-explained#hypotension
  5. https://www.everydayhealth.com/hypertension/understanding/what-does-blood-pressure-measure.aspx
  6. https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/blood-pressure-and-your-brain

 

Tourette’s is reversible

We’ll get there in a second. But first, is Tourette’s genetic? The majority of cases are inherited. Kinda. Here’s what Wikipedia says about it:

A person with Tourette’s has about a 50% chance of passing the gene(s) to one of his or her children, but Tourette’s is a condition of variable expression and incomplete penetrance. Thus, not everyone who inherits the genetic vulnerability will show symptoms; even close family members may show different severities of symptoms, or no symptoms at all. The gene(s) may express as Tourette’s, as a milder tic disorder (provisional or chronic tics), or as obsessive–compulsive symptoms without tics. Only a minority of the children who inherit the gene(s) have symptoms severe enough to require medical attention. Gender appears to have a role in the expression of the genetic vulnerability: males are more likely than females to express tics.

I have a science background, and looking at this type of explanation makes me cringe. Read it for yourself, but it seems like we’re trying to make a genetic model fit when it’s really something we just can’t explain. 

It’s associated with OCD, ADD, ADHD, and sleep disorders. This shouldn’t surprise you at this point. We’ve discussed the nature of these diseases and how they are more related than anyone knows. In my opinion, the brain is binary. It’s either working properly or it’s not. And if it’s not, there’s a host of different functions that will be impaired. [see There is only one brain disease]

It’s 3-4 times more likely in guys than girls. It’s the same reason that men are more likely to get skin cancer and on average live about six years less. Why? Because of their brain activity. They are further from their ground state, so time feels slower. Recovery takes longer.

White kids are twice as likely as black and Hispanic kids to get Tourette’s.  Why is that? Resting brain activity. It’s the same reason that black kids are more likely to play in the NFL. The closer their brains are to the delta state the faster they recover and better they operate.

Tics may remit with age. This is from Wikipedia. But it’s huge. Why? Because using my model of the human brain, this means that Tourette’s is a reversible condition. How do we reverse it? Same way we reverse other brain dysfunctions:

  1. Identify the loop. This is the repeated behavior. It should be pretty obvious.
  2. Identify the fears causing the loop. What are they afraid of? What makes them act like this?
  3. Identify the logic causing the fears. Why are they scared of this?
  4. Doubt the logic. Question their reasoning. If you can change their mind, you can change their brain.

 

Sources:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourette_syndrome
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/tourette/data.html

Dads cause Dwarfism

OK. So a couple days ago we went through Down Syndrome, and how it is closely tied with the age of mothers, and how that means that we play a large role in causing or preventing it.

Today, I want to talk about the dads. We know that there are some strong correlations between the age of dads and a list of birth defects. We need to know a couple things: are they genetic disorders? Is it the lifestyle of the dads that determines these outcomes? Is it predetermined at conception? Or is it something that can be corrected?

What birth defects are closely correlated to the age of their fathers:

  • autism
  • schizophrenia
  • dwarfism/Achondroplasia
  • Apert’s Syndrome

We’ve already talked about autism and schizophrenia, and how I think they are both curable and why. So while they are equally important, we’re going to focus on dwarfism today.

B9781455727940000085_f008-003-9781455727940
Mother’s Age And Down Syndrome [left] and Father’s age and Achondroplasia and Apert’s Syndrome [right] Source
It’s a random gene mutation. But it’s random and we don’t even really know why it mutates. Apparently it’s called epigenetics, which essentially undermines genetics, in my opinion. Think about it for a second, the entire field of genetics is about mapping a stationary code of a human being and predicting his offspring. If that code is not stationary, how can we predict changes in the person or his offspring?

Sometimes we can identify dwarfism during pregnancy. In many cases it can be identified at birth. Because of these two observations, I think it’s safe to say that dwarfism is not reversible. I’m sure you’re thinking that’s obvious, but this is coming from the guy who thinks Alzheimer’s is curable, so I need to be sure.

It’s really pretty simple [if you read my proof on Down Syndrome]: we know the age of the father is closely tied with an increased risk for dwarfism. We know that age is literally just a number, and really begins in the brain. We’ve even shown why and how this happens. And the best part: it’s reversible.

So I get it. You’re not looking to do any more research. You just want answers. You control more about the health of your baby than you know. Get healthy before you get anybody pregnant.

Sources:

  1. https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2016/05/16/Age-lifestyle-of-father-linked-to-birth-defects/3941463405522/
  2. https://gumc.georgetown.edu/news/Review-Finds-Fathers-Age-Lifestyle-Associated-With-Birth-Defects
  3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dwarfism/symptoms-causes/syc-20371969
  4. https://www.webmd.com/children/dwarfism-causes-treatments#2
  5. https://www.nhs.uk/news/genetics-and-stem-cells/dads-age-diet-and-lifestyle-may-cause-birth-defects/
  6. https://mobile.nytimes.com/2007/02/28/health/28iht-snfert.4748536.html
  7. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160515183716.htm
  8. https://www.thenba.ca/uncategorized/can-dwarfism-be-diagnosed-during-pregnancy/